Access to Library E-Resources From Off-Campus is Changing….

Starting on December 3rd, this is the view Phillips Exeter Academy faculty, staff and students will have when they try to access the library’s e-resources from home.  Just navigate to the Library website ( http://www.exeter.edu/libraries/553.aspx ,) click on the “E-Resources” link in the lower left column or go the the “Find Articles” search tab.  If you are anywhere outside the Academy network you will receive the screen pictured below after you click on your desired title.  Just enter your regular Phillips Exeter Academy network username/password and you will have full-text access to all of our databases, e-journals and e-books from anywhere you have internet access.  The downloading of Citrix will no longer be necessary. If you have any questions or comments please contact the Library Systems Coordinator/ Reference Librarian, Melinda Dolan (mdolan@exeter.edu).

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New Library Exhibit: Out of the Dark, into the Light

Anyone who has ever watched even just one episode of the Antiques Road Show knows that people collect or save all kinds of things.  Over time, the Academy Library has had many unusual and interesting things donated to us  that people, usually loyal and generous alumni, collected or saved, sometimes from their Exeter days, or just because the liked it.  The new Library exhibit, Out of the Dark, into the Light, arranged by Ed Desrochers, features a selection of unusual things from the library’s many collections.

The west case on the main floor contains items from our numerous special collections: a record on papyrus from the 3rd – 6th Century A.D., examples of miniature books, a collection of Chinese gouache paintings on pith paper,  a ceramic Chinese funeral procession, a group of illuminated manuscripts,  her majesty Queen Victoria’s seal in wax, a knife from the winter palace of Czarina Maria Alexandrovna, and commemorative medals from the time of Napoleon.

The east Case displays a selection of items from the Academy Archives:  artifacts from John and Sarah Phillips, a sword presented by John Phillips to his cousin  Lt. Josiah Gilman, a silver tray presented to Prof. George Albert Wentworth on his retirement in 1905, a cane for the Principal that students had made from the ruins of the Second Academy Building destroyed by fire in 1870, a miniature baseball bat won in 1935 by the recipient of the  Dana Wingate Baseball Trophy, a leather football helmet worn by Herbert Greenleaf Noyes PEA 1917, a scrapbook maintained by Donald B. Straub PEA 1924, Daniel Webster’s razor, two trophies with a story to tell, and a ring and candlestick that belonged to Lewis Cass, PEA 1792.

Items in the three sections of the display case in the lobby are being changed every week so that more items can be shown.  This case will contain items either from one of our special collections or from the Academy Archives.  Displayed right now are some handwriting exercises from the early years of the Academy, as well as some examples of student Math workbooks from 1792 to 1819.

Many of these unusual things can’t be worked into any other exhibits very easily, so from time to time it’s fun to just take them out and give people a chance to see them.

 

The H.G. Noyes 1917 football helmet.
The H.G. Noyes 1917 football helmet.
From an album of tintype portraits.
From an album of tintype portraits.

Community Action Day in the Library

John Phillips would have been very pleased to see our Library yesterday. 

Ten students and one faculty member, Eimer Page, worked in the library dusting the shelves as their Community Action Day project.  Most of the shelves on the upper floors were dusted, and all of the shelves in the Academy Archives.  The following quote, for the original Deed of Gift for the Academy, clearly outlines John Phillips’ expectations that were fulfilled during yesterday’s Community Action Day. The students did not procure material for the Library, but they sure made it a better place to be.   

           Quote from the Deed of Gift                             

“They are to give special attention to the health of the scholars, and ever to urge the importance of an habit of industry. For these purposes they may encourage the scholars to perform some manual labor, such as gardening, or the like, so far as is consistent with cleanliness and the inclination of their parents; and the fruit of their labor shall be applied, at the direction of the trustees, for procuring a library, or in some other way increasing the usefulness of this Seminary.”

 
Quote from the Deed of Gift